Tag Archives: employee engagement

Communication - Leadership

Have You Committed Murder by PowerPoint?

Concordia Consulting’s monthly series on presentations skills continues this week. Last month, I shared information on preparing for a board meeting. The principles of preparation are the same whether you and your group are preparing for a board meeting, a sales meeting, or a staff meeting. Step one defined a clearly-stated purpose. Today we will consider the role of visuals in a presentation.

Too often when I work with a team on preparing a presentation, the first thing they do is head over to PowerPoint and start making slides. While visuals are critical, and can be helpful for both the presenter as well as the audience by adding structure to the presentation, the presentation must have structure first and visuals second.

So, step one is to formalize the purpose and put it in a prominent place the entire time you are writing and thinking about the presentation. Remember: a clear purpose for every meeting you hold is imperative for success. For example, “Lead fundraising efforts for new facility by finding donors and soliciting funds.”

Do your visuals:

  • Use pictures and graphics?
  • Keep words to a minimum*?
  • Contribute to the point you are making, especially if you are using animation?
  • Help to keep the audience’s attention?

*If anyone can read your PowerPoint and know your presentation, you’ve gone too far. Your visuals should enhance YOU and the presentation, they should not be the presentation. If there is a lot of text (perhaps financials or contraindications of a drug), provide supplementary text in a board book or handout.

For visuals to enhance, make sure each one:

  • Helps to support the purpose of the presentation
  • Is crisp and clear
  • Shows a graphic or picture that will help focus your audience (and you!)

If you aren’t great at creating visuals yourself, software programs can help. In addition to PowerPoint, Prezi creates engaging graphics for presentations.

Visuals help you stay focused, so I hope you will use them.

How do you like to use visuals?

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Leadership - Mindset

Love Words in the Workplace

When I was in elementary school, I loved Valentine’s Day. I loved giving and receiving valentines. I remember laboring over the class list, and with my very best fourth grade penmanship, handwriting each classmate’s name on an envelope. Then I would carefully select the perfect ready-made Valentine to exactly fit each classmate.

Another thing I enjoyed was the Valentine’s Day word search puzzle. What do you enjoy about Valentine’s Day in your workplace? Is anything different? More fun?

Here’s an adult version for your Valentine’s Day pleasure. Enjoy!

Let me know what words you think I am missing.

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Diversity and Inclusion

Sweatshirt Creates Cold Chill

When I first saw this ad from H&M, the huge retailer, I thought, “What kind of diversity do they have on their marketing team?”

What my colleague Tina and I know from our training as coaches and Tina’s certification as a Diversity Professional is that diverse work groups would have noticed this and someone would have raised the red flag to stop the campaign.

Knowing that, I then wondered, “Did someone notice and not care enough to stop the campaign?” Did they notice and mention the problem, and their words fell on deaf ears? What kind of corporate culture would thwart “the someone” from speaking out? What kind of corporate culture would be dismissive if “the someone” spoke up and no one cared? And finally, did the organization know and choose to alienate a large group of customers (now former customers)?

As our nation struggles with gender equality as well as diversity and inclusion, those issues seep into boardrooms and workplaces. Tina and I have been consultants and coaches long enough to be a part of the trends. We used to advise companies to stay away from politics. Now organizations are making statements with their policies and their attitudes.

As Oprah so powerfully stated at the Golden Globes recently (echoing the female leaders in Hollywood), “a new day is on the horizon”. While Oprah was referring to women long being silenced by powerful men, the lesson extends beyond Hollywood and beyond sexual harassment.  Organizations must create appropriate times and places to hold conversations regarding what is appropriate in their company. Companies are “at risk” when they don’t take the time to assess their workplace culture or have an independent group do that for them.

Every day another company, industry and celebrity is exposed for wrongdoing. At Concordia, we know that the more diverse a workplace, the more effective the workplace. And we don’t define diversity with only ethnicity, gender, and age. In response to the news and the world we currently live in, we have developed a new program on Diversity and Inclusion. And it’s not what you are thinking. There’s no guilt, shame, or uncomfortableness. It’s actually a lot of fun and we will work with you to make sure your team wants to be there. Give us a call if you want to know how Diversity and Inclusion can be both fun and profitable.

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