Tag Archives: Employees

Conflict Resolution - Diversity and Inclusion

What Would You Do?

In order to create a respectful and inclusive culture, organizations need to provide regular diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) training. But once you have had that basic training, how can you mix it up and make it relevant year after year?

At Concordia Consulting, we have found a way! We have adapted actual situations that we have been asked to remedy by changing them just enough to protect those involved. Then we implement the scenarios using a case-study approach to bring our training to life.

Want to try one? 

Edgar, a white male board member of a nonprofit organization, repeatedly asked Lucia, a Latina woman serving on the same board, where she went to college and if he could see her resume. Edgar had never asked anyone else on the board for similar information. Lucia has her PhD in the same field that this organization represents and she is a full professor at the University of Virginia. In terms of education, Lucia is probably the most qualified person on the entire board. 

Lucia resigns from the board saying, “Forget it! I’m tired of being questioned. I don’t need this.” Now half of the employees of the organization want to quit because they don’t respect their board.   

Other factors include the organization’s public communications asserting a strong position on DEI — and the fact that Edgar donates almost 5% of operating revenue.
Questions:

  • If you were Lucia, how would you respond to Edgar about your treatment?
  • How would you respond if you were a board member and witnessed the different way Lucia was treated from the rest of the board?
  • As a member of the organization, what could you do about this situation?

Please let me know how you would deal with this scenario, as well as how effectively you think your organization might handle it. We will be sharing similar situations in the months to come. If you would like facilitated training with us, we will customize a program specifically for your organization’s circumstances and culture.

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Communication - Conflict Resolution - Diversity and Inclusion - Leadership

What Would You Do?

In order to create a respectful and inclusive culture, organizations need to provide regular diversity, equity, and inclusion training. But once you have had that basic training, how can you mix it up and make it relevant year after year?

At Concordia Consulting, we have found a way. We have taken real examples of situations we have been asked to remedy and have changed them just enough to protect those involved. Then we use the situations in case study format to bring our training to life.

Want to try one? 

During a meeting a client starts his comments by saying, “Millennials and their horrible progressive ideas about business…” 

Questions:

  • As an attendee at the meeting, is there anything you could do in the moment?
  • After the meeting, is there anything you could or should do?

Please let me know how you would deal with this, as well as how effectively you think your organization might handle it. We will be sharing these situations in the months to come, and if you would like facilitated training with us, we will customize them for your organization.

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Communication - Employee Engagement - Leadership - Performance Management

Are You Undergoing Kidney Surgery?

I just got off a video call with a potential client. They were consulting with me about their back-to-the-office strategy and were having problems with their vacation policy. The organization was returning to the office after over a year of remote work, and during this time no one had taken vacation days. 

I probed more deeply and found that management “said” they wanted their employees to take more vacation time and “turn off.” The client gave examples of a couple of employees traveling to the beach, working in the morning, taking time off in the afternoon, and then returning emails and writing reports late at night. I asked if the deadlines of the reports were imminent and the answer was a weak “yes.”

I was trying to understand how getting work done at unconventional times was a problem, so I asked if productivity was suffering.

No, was the response. They said that their workforce is incredibly devoted and effective, and that the organization has not suffered a loss in productivity. Sounds great, doesn’t it? Then the client told me that one of the benefits their employees are experiencing by working remotely is that they can take time off in the middle of the day for doctor’s appointments and to pick up kids from school and camps. The employees seem to like the flexibility that comes with working virtually.

This was only an hour-long call, but I was confused. It seemed okay to my client to take time off in the middle of the day to care for children or go to the doctor, but apparently taking time off to go to the beach was not? I asked, “Do you want employees to have a flexible schedule?”  

I also asked if the leadership team appreciated the employees’ productivity, and that deadlines were met, or if they were willing to slow down progress in order to encourage employees to take vacation? I asked, yet the answer was unclear.

Like all other personnel policies, it’s impossible for your employees to figure out what the policy is if you have not figured it out as a leadership team.

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