Author Archives: Karen Snyder

Mindset

Be Where You Are

You cannot tweet a handshake.
You cannot Facebook a conversation.
You cannot Hulu a hug.

How often do we all need to be reminded?
Be still.
Be present.

Your presence is your present.
Your undivided attention is a present.

Give often.

Read More
Leadership - Performance Management

The Rock and I Share Our Secrets

I was intrigued by this Instagram post a couple of months back from Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson: “Every crazy movie idea/goal/ambition/dirty joke goes up on my vision board…”

Whether or not you are a fan of The Rock, you can’t argue with his success. Whatever he has set his mind to — wrestling, acting, producing — he has been successful.

But I don’t have to look to The Rock for proof of the power of vision boards. I’ve been using them personally since I was twenty, as well as finding them to be an invaluable tool in my career as a professional coach and business consultant.

Simply put, vision boards put your goals into pictures, thereby creating a material and visually stimulating reference to keep you focused on your aspirations and what you need to do to get there. When you can clarify your goals, you can reach your goals.

Ten years ago, I had a client who had left her career to stay home with her kids, and she was now ready to re-enter the workforce. She was concerned about work-life balance, so her vision board took a whole-life approach. There was an image of a mother at her desk; pictures of home renovations she wanted to make; and exercise photos, because she knew activity would help her manage both her stress and her weight.

It was a very busy vision board because she’s a very, very busy person. The richness that she put into the vision board has come to fruition. She got her master’s degree, landed a great job, and exercises daily. And she swears that the board helped keep her on track and focused.

The beauty of vision boards is that they are flexible. Your vision board can encapsulate what you would like your whole life to look like, or it can focus on a single aspect, such as organization or nutrition or finances. It’s your board, so there are no hard and fast rules. And you might have multiple boards — maybe one for your personal running program and another for the new product you want to launch at work.

Vision boards can be useful for teams as well since they articulate goals in visual form and can be posted in a common area as a reminder of your team’s aspirations.

So make like The Rock and make your board awesome! And let me know how you’ve used vision boards to reach your goals.

Read More
Mindset

Deer Nightmares and Your Five

When my eldest son Josh was six, we moved into our home. Our neighborhood was built in a wooded area and, unfortunately, the building of this community displaced wildlife. We had new landscaping and the deer were thrilled with the fresh vegetation that had been planted. My husband and I talked, evidently quite a lot, about how to prevent the deer from eating our new plantings.

Our son Josh, being young and impressionable, had a nightmare about the deer. It was a wake-up call to me, quite literally, to be more careful about what I talked about and what stressors I brought into our home.

A few months ago, I was working with a chief financial officer, Beatrice. Beatrice told me that her chief operating officer Marsha was just so negative, and it was wearing her down. Beatrice would come in each day, excited about her work and her to-do list, but she soon felt disempowered. When I asked more clarifying questions, I learned that Beatrice and Marsha arrived at work early and started their day by going for coffee. They enjoyed this morning ritual, and they genuinely liked and cared about each other.

As Beatrice continued, she said that she often felt overwhelmed after their talks. She felt anxious about how the board might respond to a new project she was presenting, possibly because Marsha raised a number of obstacles in a fearful way. She worried that when she gave performance feedback to Vince, he would become explosive, because, you guessed it, Marsha had given Vince feedback before and it had not gone well.

I learned that Beatrice “coffeed” with Marsha because she was lonely at the top. As an executive director, there were few people Beatrice could confide in since she couldn’t talk about personnel issues or her own vulnerability with her staff. Marsha was Beatrice’s only confidant.

Unlike Beatrice, my son Josh didn’t have much of a choice about what he listened to; he was a child in his home. As a child, it is more difficult to just tune someone out (although by the time many kids are teenagers, they have tuning out parents down to an art form!).

As Beatrice and I talked, we discussed how Marsha squashed her enthusiasm, increased her anxiety, and simply, “rained on her parade.” When we discussed stopping the coffee habit, Beatrice was concerned about hurting Marsha’s feelings. As we explored further, Beatrice recognized that by giving Marsha a “voice or platform” she was actually enabling this negativity.

Jim Rohn, a motivational speaker and businessman, famously said that “you are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” This statement, while not scientific, is widely accepted and acknowledged as true.

Who do you spend time with, and do they take you down or do they help you advance to your next, higher level?

Read More
1 3 4 5 6 7 33